Dropdown button for navigation mobile view

Seven Facts about Dependents and Exemptions

Posted by: Zaher Fallahi
Posted On: Feb 27, 2014

There are a few tax rules that affect everyone who files a federal income tax return. This includes the rules for dependents and exemptions. The IRS has seven facts on these rules to help you file your taxes.

 

1. Exemptions cut income.  There are two types of exemptions: personal exemptions and exemptions for dependents. You can usually deduct $3,900 for each exemption you claim on your 2013 tax return.

 

2. Personal exemptions.  You can usually claim an exemption for yourself. If you’re married and file a joint return you can also claim one for your spouse. If you file a separate return, you can claim an exemption for your spouse only if your spouse had no gross income, is not filing a return, and was not the dependent of another taxpayer.

 

3. Exemptions for dependents.  You can usually claim an exemption for each of your dependents. A dependent is either your child or a relative that meets certain tests. You can’t claim your spouse as a dependent. You must list the Social Security number of each dependent you claim. See IRS Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction, and Filing Information, for rules that apply to people who don’t have an SSN.

 

4. Some people don’t qualify.  You generally may not claim married persons as dependents if they file a joint return with their spouse. There are some exceptions to this rule.

 

5. Dependents may have to file.  People that you can claim as your dependent may have to file their own federal tax return. This depends on many things, including the amount of their income, their marital status and if they owe certain taxes.

 

6. No exemption on dependent’s return.  If you can claim a person as a dependent, that person can’t claim a personal exemption on his or her own tax return. This is true even if you don’t actually claim that person as a dependent on your tax return. The rule applies because you have to right to claim that person.

 

7. Exemption phase-out.  The $3,900 per exemption is subject to income limits. This rule may reduce or eliminate the amount depending on your income. See Publication 501 for details.

You can get Publication 501 at IRS.gov or order it by calling 800-TAX-FORM(800-829-3676). Use the Interactive Tax Assistant at IRS.gov to find out if a person qualifies as your dependent.

 

For assistance with any tax matters, including the IRS representation and disclosing your undeclared foreign bank accounts, you may contact Zaher Fallahi, Tax Attorney, CPA, at (310) 719-1040 (Los Angeles) or (714) 546-4272 (Orange County), or e-mail to taxattorney@zfcpa.com.

Mr. Fallahi has been an exceptional attorney throughout my experience with him. His deep expertise and thorough understanding of OFAC law were evident. He provided clear and insightful guidance that was crucial in my case. Mr. Fallahi's professionalism and commitment to me as his client were truly commendable. He consistently ensured my concerns were addressed promptly and effectively. I highly recommend Mr. Fallahi to anyone seeking expert advice and representation in OFAC matters.
It's been an honor to know Zaher Fallahi, Esq for the past 49 years.He is one of kind in almost everything. His clients and friends are always his priority. In my long life, I have had the chance to be helped by many people. But ZaherFalahi is a distinguished personality that his professionalism helped me to succeed in life.And that's why I never hesitate to refer my family and friends for all their legal and financial matters to him.
I have had the pleasure of knowing attorney Zaher Fallahi for over 10 years in a professional capacity. Zaher is knowledgeable, diligent, capable and a conscientious attorney. Zaher has a strong reputation in his field - International Tax and Undisclosed Foreign Bank Accounts - and is a good person, in general. I highly recommend him for your legal needs.
More reviews
js_loader
Request Consultation